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Valve continues to improve Linux Vulkan Shader Pre-Caching

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Recently we wrote about a new feature for Linux in the Steam Client Beta, where Steam can now sort out Vulkan shaders before running a game. With the latest build, it gets better.

The idea of it, as a brief reminder, is to prepare all the shaders needed for Vulkan games while you download and / or before you hit Play. This would help to stop constant stuttering seen in some games on Linux, mostly from running Windows games in the Proton compatibility layer, as native / supported Linux games would usually do it themselves. Just another way Valve are trying to get Linux gaming on Steam in all forms into tip-top shape.

Here's what's changed in the latest Steam Beta:

Linux Shader Pre-Caching

  • Added support for merging NVIDIA per-thread cache files after processing new Vulkan pipelines and after a game exits
  • Adjusted core count of background Vulkan pipeline processing to a quarter of logical cores by default
  • Changed processing tasks to idle priority
  • Updated Vulkan layer API version

Want to try out the latest Steam Beta? Go into Settings on Steam and it's on the first section you see:


Steam will then restart to do the update.

Will be great when this is rolled out to everyone, as it's a very clever way to get around the Proton shader stuttering issue using the open source Fossilize library and Vulkan layer.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com - do not reproduce this article without permission. This RSS feed is intended for readers, not scrapers.

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hexdsl
6 days ago
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The Generic USB Display Driver Taking Shape For Linux 5.9~5.10

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One of the interesting new happenings in the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver space is a Generic USB Display stack including a USB gadget driver that together allow for some interesting generic USB display setups. This work was motivated by being able to turn a $5 Raspberry Pi Zero into a USB to HDMI display adapter...
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6 days ago
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Aseprite v1.2.19

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Hello there asepriters! A minor release today with some critical bug fixes and some tweaks:

  • Changes to Dynamics/Pressure settings:
    • Now Brush Size is the maximum point of pressure (request)
    • Paint with Foreground Color when sensor is at its maximum value, and with Background Color when it’s at its minimum (t/5779)
  • Improve performance drawing selection boundaries
  • New hept32 palette by ENDESGA
  • Fixed some issues with some Wacom tablets on Windows
  • Fixed some critical problems in the new compressed TGA encoder
  • Fixed shading ink for RGBA and grayscale modes in some special cases
  • Fixed some crashes using shading ink and switching between sprites with different palettes
  • Fixed saving layer user data in backup sessions in case of crash #2373
  • Fixed rendering of RTL text in text entries, still requires better text editing capabilities #2355
  • Fixed Alt+click on timeline icons for selected layers #2222
  • Added missing Dialog onchange and onrelease events and expanded Dialog:modify{} function #2359 (thanks to @grauw)
  • Other fixes api#29 #2388

How to update Aseprite?

Discuss in the Community site.

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6 days ago
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Psst – Wanna Buy A Control Panel From A Nuclear Power Station?

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Doing the rounds today is an interesting lot in an otherwise unexciting industrial dispersal auction in Lincolnshire, UK. On sale is an “Ex nuclear plant reactor control/monitoring system“, at the time of writing attracting the low low bid of ÂŖ220 ($270), but we guess it will rise. Everyone who has watched Chernobyl (or maybe The Simpsons) is now gazing awestruck at a crescent of metal consoles covered in screens, buttons, and joysticks just waiting for a staff of white-coated technicians to pore over them.

Chernobyl Unit 3 control room (still active). [Source: IAEA Imagebank on Flickr CC-SA 2.0]
It’s a very cool lot indeed, but it raises more questions than it answers. The auction house has very little information indeed, so we’re left guessing, where did it come from? From this image showing the unit 3 control room at Chernobyl it’s obvious didn’t come from there (/s). Since it is for sale in the UK, and the country has decommissioned the majority of its first-generation reactors by now, so there is no shortage of candidates. But that intriguing possibility raises another question. Is it even a reactor control panel in the first place?

British civilian nuclear plants have tight security but they are hardly a secret, so plenty of photos are online showing their interiors. And in studying those we hit a problem, this panel doesn’t resemble any of the control panel images we can find. The first generation of Magnox (Magnetic Oxide Magnesium Non Oxidising) plants had panels covered in analogue dials and chart recorders so it’s unlikely to be one of those. The second-generation AGR (Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor) stations had similarly complex panels, and it’s evidently not one of them.

Looking closely at the photos it becomes apparent that there are a lot of camera controls and monitors, and even what looks like a uMatic video recorder. It’s definitely nuclear-related and the 1980s look of it suggests maybe it could have come from an Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) station, but could it be a little closer to Sector 7G than the centre of the action? Is it a video monitoring console used to keep a physical eye on its operation?

Be careful if you bid, you could end up with a rather cool but absurdly large 1980s CCTV system. Can any of our readers shed any light on the matter?

Thanks [Gregg “Cabe” Bond] for the tip.

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Godot Engine editor running in a web browser is now a thing

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Godot Engine just keeps on advancing in new and interesting ways. This free and open source game engine can now be run in a web browser - yes really.

Writing on the official blog, developer Fabio Alessandrelli mentioned that thanks to a sponsorship from Mozilla they've been able to make Godot Engine available as a HTML5 application. Currently, it needs either Firefox Nightly or a very recent Chromium based browser, due to the features it needs like Shared Array Buffer.

Yup, that's Godot Engine on Linux in Chromium alright.

It's not finished yet and they're clear that Godot Engine will not be transitioning fully to the web, this is just an extra option to bring down some barriers and enable even more people to use it. Godot itself can export games to HTML5 but it wasn't done for the game engine due to past browser limitations that are gradually being added thanks to things like WebAssembly, WebAssembly threads, Javascript SharedArrayBuffer and more. Work on this, can also then help games made from Godot work even better in the browser too.

Amazing what you can do in a browser window now.

Great work by Alessandrelli there for Godot Engine. Try it yourself here and see the full info here.

Article from GamingOnLinux.com - do not reproduce this article without permission. This RSS feed is intended for readers, not scrapers.

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6 days ago
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8GB Raspberry Pi 4 released for $75 – Specifications

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8GB Raspberry Pi 4 released for USD 75
Back in June 2019, the Raspberry PI 4 model was released, and it was an incredible update over the older model with up to 4GB ram. Today we see the long-rumored 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 released and priced at the just US $75. Here are the complete specs for an updated 64-bit credit card size Raspberry PI 4 8GB model with Linux desktop computer level of performance.

The post 8GB Raspberry Pi 4 released for $75 – Specifications appeared first on nixCraft.

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hexdsl
8 days ago
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